Trudie

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Trudie
DAL 6 Level 4
DAL 6 Level 4
Jan 27, 2021
In PAST EVENTS
Inset Side Seam Pocket #1 On January 15th I wrote a note on making Side Seam Inset pockets. I also explained that the hand pushes downward as it enters the pocket, so I gave instructions for making pocket linings that are based on biasing by working a M1 at the beg of every 4th RSR inside the selvedge stitch, then working a K2tog dec at the end of the row before the ending selvedge. Picking up can be with the techniques on the pages referenced in KDW in that post, or can also be worked with the pickup and knit technique with the WSR facing to leave the selvedge stitches on the side edge exposed. That will be the top of the pocket. Stitches could then be picked up along this edge for adding an edging. What must be remembered with this type of pocket is that the Right Sides will be facing inside and the Wrong Sides will be facing out when the 2 linings (back and front) are sewn together. That is why I explained that the back and fronts are worked in reverse with this biased shaping. These linings can also be made separately and seamed to the garment back and front edges, then the back and front linings can be sewn together. In that case four pieces would be knit working 2 with the increases at the beg and the decs at the ends and two would be worked in reverse. Also, only 2 biased linings could be made just for the fronts. They would be sewn to the fronts around the 3 sides leaving the side opening for the hand entry. Inset Side Seam Pocket #2 With this type of pocket the lining is made separately and sewn to the fronts, leaving the side edge open for entry by the hand. When making pockets linings separately, use a cast on that will give you a thin bottom edge, e.g., a simple thumb cast on. The Practice Swatch for the Right Front could be knit as foll: Cast on 30 sts = 28 + 2 selvedge stitches and work even until piece measures 3” / 7.5 cm. Then, beg decreasing by SSK at the RH edge inside the selvedge stitch on every RSR 29 times. Bind off the rem stitch. Make a 2nd pocket lining reversing all shaping = P2 tog 29 times at the beg of WSRs 29 times. As I explained with the first pocket lining construction in the original post, plan them based on your hand measurements. As I also explained in that original post, because the hand pushes downward as it enters a pocket the shaping that will accommodate that is important. This shaping is designed with that in mind. Happy Knitting! Shirley
Inset Side Seam Pockets (Continued) content media
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Trudie
DAL 6 Level 4
DAL 6 Level 4
Jan 17, 2021
In PAST EVENTS
This is Shirley's response to a question Ashika asked in the WLSP Ravelry group about the Sloped Bind off Technique. Question: I feel grafting and picking up stitches from Sloped BO edge is difficult. I think it tends to get holes. Is there something good tips or techniques? or just practice? Shirley’s Response While the Sloped Bind off Technique eliminates the need for having to seam around jagged edges that can occur when pieces are shaped with the standard Pullover Bind Off method, careful attention is needed to avoid picking up in the gaps (that result from the slipping) when seaming. The situation is that because we are spanning 2 rows with the slipped stitches, we get the stitch elongation and the resulting small gaps below that are the hallmark of slipped edge stitches. If you are unable to clearly see where to pickup or seam without entering the gaps, my recommendation is to run a thin basting thread in a contrasting color through the spaces beneath the slipped stitches. In that way the stitches running directly below that you want to pick up in, or seam in will be easy to see. Another situation that can occur when seaming around the gaps of the elongated slipped stitches can happen when seaming on curves, e.g., seaming the cap of a set-in sleeve to an armhole. If you use the Mattress Stitch seaming technique in combination with the slipped stitches it may be difficult to get your finished seam to look neat. Making sure that you seam below the slipped stitches if you are using Mattress Stitch is very important. My seaming recommendation when using the sloped method with a deep curve is to use the Backstitch seaming technique. You can practice the technique so you will be able to achieve a thin neat seam that will result in a professional finish. A Note on Mattress Stitch vs. Backstitch Seaming Techniques Mattress Stitch seaming is essentially a basting technique that is held in place by the beginning and ending attaching techniques. Backstitch is a true seaming technique. To test this you can use the Mattress Stitch technique to sew two swatches together. If you then remove the figure 8 starting attachment and pull the seaming yarn, you will be able to pull the entire length of yarn out as is the case with temporary basting. Backstitch is a firm seam that can add stability for certain stitch patterns, e.g., lace. It can also provide strong seams for parts of a garment that will endure lots of movement, e.g. caps of sleeves. Both are good seaming methods for hand knits. However, for each project, selecting a seaming method is a part of finishing that should be carefully considered. I always recommend basting your garment together before seaming and observing the drape and hang of each section. In that way you can make the best decision on the proper seaming method to use. References in Knitwear Design Workshop Backstitch Seaming Pages 267 and 270 Mattress Seaming Pages 268-270 Shirley
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Trudie
DAL 6 Level 4
DAL 6 Level 4
Jan 15, 2021
In PAST EVENTS
In this post, Shirley provides technical details on how to incorporate pockets in your garments . There are endless varieties of pockets and it is always important to select a pocket that is a good match for the style and stitch pattern of your garment. For this double breasted and heavily cabled Pea Coat my recommendation would be an Inset Side Seam pocket. That type of pocket will not interrupt the beautiful cabled patterns. These types of pockets can be worked at the same time as the garment by knitting to the position where the pocket will begin, making a turning ridge or fold line (slip the turning stitch purlwise on RSRs and purl the slipped st on WSRs) and working the pocket linings to the correct depth as you work the garment. You would do this on both sides of the back and fronts, then sew the linings together during the finishing process. The linings would hang free inside. These types of side edge pockets could also be added after the garment is completed and for this project I recommend working them once the knitting is finished. They can be picked up and worked on the side edges as a part of the finishing process or even added after you have seamed your sides if you do not feel that you want pockets now, but later decide to add them. In that case, you could just open the seam to the correct length and work the linings. Working the Inset Side Seam Pocket Linings You only need to pick up the required number of stitches along the side rows of the front and back on each side, and knit the pocket linings to the desired depth, then sew them together. You will want to make the pocket linings in stockinette because this fabric will lie flat. You will also want to work the linings in a firm tension which will mean going down a needle size or two so the pockets will not become baggy or stretch out of shape. Also, based on the way the hand enters the pocket in a downward direction, you will want a more angled shape for this type of side edge pocket. To construct your pockets in that manner you can work as follows: Begin with the right side seam back edge and pick up the number of stitches needed along that side edge based on your hand measurements and gauge (see Pocket Planning below). Add a selvedge stitch. Working in stockinette stitch, on every 4th RSR begin with a make 1 increase (knit on the running yarn between the selvedge and the first stitch) after the beg selvedge, then end the row with a K2tog before the ending selvedge. When the pocket lining measures the correct length for your hand, based on your measurements, bind off all sts. Work the front pocket lining in the same way. Sew the pocket linings together. Then, work the pocket linings on the left side seam in reverse. References For picking up sts see Knitwear Design Workshop (KDW) pages 264-266. For seaming the back and front pocket linings together, I recommend using the backstitch seaming method (see KDW page 267). Note: Since pockets are small, you can make a swatch and baste it on the garment to ensure that it will be the correct size. Pocket Planning (Measurements and Placement) For a pocket to be useful, you will want to make sure that your hand will fit comfortably inside. This means that it needs to be the correct width and length with sufficient ease. An easy way to measure your hand and make a schematic is to simply place it palm down on a piece of paper with your fingers together and trace around it beginning and ending at the wrist. For the width, measure across on the paper, from the outside of the thumb joint to the outside of the joint below the little finger on the opposite side and draw your width line, then write the measurement there. For length, measure from the wrist to the tip of the longest finger. Draw your length line and write the measurement there. Also, measure the length from your shoulder to your wrist. The wrist length is usually where you will want the Inset Side Seam Pocket to end on your garment. The top opening will be about 2“ below your waist. The width of the pocket should have 1" - 2” of ease based on your hand measurement. The depth of the pocket will be at least 1” longer than the measurement from your wrist to the end of your longest finger. Happy Knitting!
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